Spanish Civil War

Stanley G. Payne and the Road to Revolution

If you've read my ongoing discussion of the Spanish Civil War, you know one of my favorite authors is Stanley G. Payne.

He now has a article up at First Things which provides an excellent and concise account of Spain's slide into civil war.

It is a serious read, but well worth your time.

It also dovetails with the misgivings I expressed in November, which have not in any way been assuaged. 

In one sense, it is comforting that a historian with Payne's stature seems to share my sense of deja vu, but it is also deeply alarming.  I don't know Payne's politics, but his work has always been scrupulously neutral, carefully noting the excesses of the Spanish Right but also providing appropriate context within the environment and balancing them with the behavior of the Spanish Left.

This isn't false equivalence, but necessary information.  Similarly, his article offers no analogies, draws no modern parallels because it doesn't have to.  The modern left is purposefully using the exact same slogans and tactics.  To merely quote them is to expose this.

Maybe my book was driven by a premonition or subconsciously intended as a warning.  In any event, it's uncomfortably relevant.


Music to write by

Last night I was bit by the writing bug, and cranked out 500 words on a new project, but I have no idea if it will go anywhere.

I seem to do a lot of that lately.  It isn't exactly writer's block, since I'm not under any obligation to write anything at the moment.

A big part of writing is mood.  With each book, I've had something of a soundtrack to facilitate creativity.

Battle Officer Wolf was written while listening to Enya's Amarantine album, over and over again.

For much of A Man of Destiny, I had a Star Wars mix of the darker ("imperial") pieces playing.

I had a special mix as well for Vampires of Michigan, which drew heavily from the Blood and Chocolate soundtrack.  (Yes, I know that movie was about werewolves, so sue me.)

Long Live Death didn't really have a soundtrack.  I just wrote it in a manic frenzy perhaps sensing the parallels between the faltering Second Spanish Republic and our own.

As for my other books, there was nothing specific, though Three Weeks with the Coasties sometimes caused me to look up the music that was popular at the time.

In any event, 2020 is winding down and so it will soon be time for me to start my 2021 book. 

Perhaps instead of thinking about topics, I need to think about music?


This Thanksgiving, I'm thankful for all the corrections

The title of this post may seem ironic, but I'm completely sincere. 

I know some authors are very sensitive about their work (and I can be at times), but what we all want is reader engagement, and nothing I've written has gotten a response like Long Live Death.

Much of that comes from people noting errors or typos, and I'm fine with that because it means people are paying attention.

It's a wonderful thing.

This is a strange year in many ways, not the least of which our family had our 'feast' three days ago so that we could all be together (one of my kids has to travel), so today we'll eat turkey soup and finish off the leftovers.

For all that, I'm grateful for so much, and I hope you and yours enjoy this day in a spirit of true gratitude.


I'm getting a very 1935 vibe

Back in August I talked about how my research for Long Live Death led me to see some uncomfortable similarities between Spain and the current situation.

That feeling is now all-consuming.

I am deeply troubled by the way things are moving.  I'm old enough to remember the contested election of 2000 very clearly, and the media was much more scrupulous about not outrunning events or trying to force the issue.

Add in the increasing attacks on Catholic churches and religion in general, and I see dark times ahead of our nation.

If one examines the lead-up to the Spanish Civil War, there were multiple opportunities for things to de-escalate, but the Spanish Left was uninterested in them. 

I fear their ideological heirs have not learned their history, and may make the same mistakes.

Let us pray that this is not the case.

 


Memories of elections gone by

Eight years ago I ran for my local school board.  It was an interesting experience, because while I had worked in politics for many years, I'd never actually been a candidate before.

Perhaps the strangest thing was being the one in charge.  I got to decide what I said!  That sounds a bit odd, but if you work in politics, most of the time you're either asking people to say something or repeating what they said to someone else.  It was weird being in charge and able to say whatever I wanted.

I didn't win, but that was fine with me.  The entire reason I ran was to get rid of the school board president, and in that respect I was successful.

I've come to cordially despise politics and for those new here, I am officially A Man of No Party.  I've been a Democrat and a Republican and now I'm sick of them both.  How I vote is my business, and I haven't given a penny to a political cause since I got out of "the game" in 2006.

Politics seems to intrude everywhere these days, and everything from the food you eat to the car you drive is now held up to a political lens.  It's exhausting.

I like to think that when the election is finally over this will go away, but I'm afraid it won't.  I've said before that everything happening now seems like a replay of Spain in 1935-36.  I pray that I'm wrong.


The uncanny parallels

I try to keep this blog free of politics, but the last few weeks have brought out a series of very alarming parallels between the current situation in America and that in pre-Civil War Spain.

As Stanley G. Payne pointed out in great detail in his Spanish Civil War, by 1935 the Spanish Left reached a point where it believed that no other party should be allowed to govern Spain.  This repudiated the constitution that they themselves had written only recently.

Time and again, they broke laws, ignored customs and always chose to escalate rather than calm.  Payne goes through an entire checklist of "off ramps" the Left ignored, any one of which could have avoided the resulting carnage of war.

The fact of the matter is that it is difficult to push a war on people who don't want one.  The Man of Destiny series was written in calmer times, but I recognized that one of the fatal flaws in the Star Wars prequels was how arbitrary and random the start of the Clone War was.

Thus when I began telling my story, I spent all of the first book and half of the second chronicling the downward spiral, including opportunities for both sides to de-escalate.

All historical parallels are inexact and one can rightly note that the standard of living, technology, international reach of modern American cannot be compared with that of Spain in 1936. 

Still, I cannot deny that part of the frenzy that drove me to write Long Live Death was a desire to get out in front of events and supply the book as a cautionary tale.  Spain's leaders in 1936 did not have many examples of how a seemingly united and peaceful society can disintegrate into conflict.  We do, with not just Spain but the breakdown of Yugoslavia serving as grim reminders that the bonds that keep nations together can collapse with frightful speed.

I will conclude by asking those of a religious bent to include a plea for reconciliation, forgiveness and renewed unity in your prayers.  We need all the help we can get.


Long Live Death is a Best Seller!

Sales are starting to trickle in for Long Live Death, largely thanks to a big plug from the bookworms over at Ace of Spades HQ.

Naturally, they've already found typographic errors - ah, for the luxury of copy editor!

Still, it's the #1 New Release in History of Spain and Portugal! 

It's up to #3 for Best Sellers in History of Spain and Portugal.

How about that?

I'm actually a Best Selling Author.

Whoa.

 

 

 

 


Why did Amazon jack up their cover creator? I miss Createspace

When I first started self-publishing, Amazon had two options.

You could go direct to digital, or use their paperback portal, called "Createspace."

The latter had a much more flexible way to develop a book cover, and since you could port paperbacks into the Kindle system anyway, that was the way I always went.

But that's gone away, so now cover options are pretty terrible.  I'm thinking of just doing the whole file on my own.  Well, after this book, that is.  Right now I just want to finish.

I suppose the ugly truth is that e-books pretty much dominate publishing these days.  What's not to like?  Money without actual printing costs.  I certainly sell more e-books than paperbacks, but I myself do not buy e-books.  I'm a traditionalist, I guess. 

Obviously, this is coming up because Long Live Death is inching towards publication.  I may yet revise the cover, but I'm going to see what I can squeeze out of the Amazon interface first.  Three Weeks with the Coasties used a default cover, but it worked with the subject matter.  The same was true of The Vampires of Michigan, but I want something a little less abstract.  We'll see how it goes.


Last minute revisions to Long Live Death

I'm hoping to finish up the edits and format the book next week, but there's already been a change.  I'm altering the title to Long Live Death:  The Keys to Victory in the Spanish Civil War.

I'm doing this to differentiate it from E.R Hooton's Spain in Arms:  A Military History of the Spanish Civil War 1936-1939.  I've remarked before that too many books on the Spanish Civil War use the exact (or very similar) titles.  I need to be part of the solution.

Hooton's book is very good, by the way, but I would not recommend it to people unfamiliar with the topic.  It is very specialized, giving a lot of (needed) detail on battles and troop strengths, command arrangements, etc.  My book is all about the military, but I focus on the big picture, not the movement of divisions from one corps to another.

I have to admit that I was worried that Hooton would steal my thunder, since we are writing about the same topic, but his book compliments mine nicely.  I think one should read mine first because it's more accessible and provides more background information.  I also have a small section that outlines some of the equipment, so that readers get a sense of what the tanks and aircraft looked like.

At that point, you are ready for Hooton's more detailed book.  He and I are in general agreement, and I cite him several times.  I'm looking forward to having this project behind me and taking a break for a while.